Posts Tagged ‘thinking’

July 23, 2012

“I think one thing to-day and another to-morrow. That is really all that’s the matter with me, except a crazy defiance and a lack of proportion.”

F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tender is the Night, Wordsworth Classics†, 1995: 107.

 

Oh, it may be worth noting that Wordsworth Classics, while dependably cheap and cheerful, also like to spot-check your sanity/whether you’ve been paying attention via the insertion of random numerical sequences:

“Along the walls on the village side all was dusty, the wriggling vines, the ters in his time. However, we shall see. Amelia,)d 64.18 431.85 m .02 0 63 272.74 (do you know what I\325ve been thinking> That mauve frock of my aunt)d 64.18 443.35 m .13 0 67 271.32 (Sarah\325s \320 now I believe I could make that up for myself for eveninto an area so green and cool that the leaves and petals were curled with tender damp.”

(As above, pp. 20-21.)

Though it’s perhaps worth un-noting the fact that I just spent the last twenty minutes trying to read some sort of coded message from this regardless.

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The Thinker as Poet

May 18, 2011

“When the early morning light quietly
grows above the mountains . . . .

The world’s darkening never reaches
to the light of Being.

We are too late for the gods and too
early for Being. Being’s poem,
just begun, is man.

To head towards a star–this only.

To think is to confine yourself to a
single thought that one day stands
still like a star in the world’s sky.”

“When in early summer the lonely narcissi
bloom hidden in the meadow and the
rock-rose gleams under the maple . . . .

The splendor of the simple.

Only image formed keeps the vision.
Yet image formed rests in the poem.

How could cheerfulness stream
through us if we wanted to shun
sadness?

Pain gives of its healing power
where we least expect it.”


Martin Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought, trans. Albert Hofstadter, New York: Harper, 1971: 4, 7.